A bad case of CAS (Cleaning Avoidance Syndrome)

July 18, 2008

wizardofoz460 Remember the scene in the Wizard of Oz when Dorothy is walking through the woods with her entourage and chanting…

“Lions and tigers and bears! Oh my!”

That’s how I feel about venturing into my teenager’s bathroom these days — except my chant goes something like…

“Mold and mildew and UGH! Oh my!

I know what you are thinking… “How come your kids aren’t cleaning their own bathroom?”

That’s the problem. They are “cleaning” their own bathroom. Unfortunately, mold and mildew and UGH! must be invisible to teenage eyes.

woman_cleaning_bathroom Every so often, I have to enter the “red zone” and do battle.

Consequently, I was delighted to to get an email from the “scrubbing bubbles” people with some tips for keeping mold and mildew and UGH! at bay. Here’s their advice…

  1. Mold and mildew build up fast in showers, especially during the humid summer months. To help reduce that buildup, open your shower door or curtain after showering and let the interior air-dry.
  2. One-stop rinsing. Keep shampoo and conditioner bottles from getting gunky by rinsing (with lids sealed) in the shower immediately after using.
  3. Dehumidify. Want to cut down on mold growth in your bathroom grout and shower tracks? Keep your bathroom exhaust fan running while you take a bath or shower and for 30 minutes afterward. It helps eliminate excess moisture that could lead to mold growth.

Now.. off to get some mildew detecting goggles for my teens.  : )

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Summer Fun

July 6, 2008

j0184959 We are definitely in the dog days of summer here in Nebraska. And in a lot of homes, the puppies… uh children… are beginning to growl.

I thought it would be a good idea to share some simple ideas to chase away the summertime blues…

  • Make juice pops by putting a popsicle stick into small paper cups of juice and freezing. Just tear away the cup to eat. This treat is not only cool – it’s healthy too.
  • Cool off with an old-fashioned water fight. Give each team a bucket of water and several sponges (the big, thirsty ones are best). The “wettest” team gets a pie (whipped cream on a sponge) in the face. Afterwards, just hose off and enjoy a sweet treat together to top off the festivities.
  • Go fishing. Dust off your old fishing pole and take the kids fishing. Talk about the different kinds of fish that you might catch and the best type of bait to attract them
  • Cool off at the library. The public library is a treasure trove of summer fun that will last for days afterwards.
  • Write letters to friends and family. Email is a great way to stay connected in today’s fast-paced world but there’s nothing like a handwritten letter. Have the kids make their own stationary or enclose a piece of artwork that may be overflowing in your own home.
  • Surprise the kids with a fun and simple supper. They’ll love this “deep sea” adventure.

Under the Sea

  • 8 oz. angel hair pasta
  • 4-6 hotdogs
  • butter or margarine
  • food coloring

Boil pasta according to package directions. Tint pasta with food coloring and butter to make greenish-blue. Snip each hotdog about halfway up – lengthwise from one end – in eight pieces. Drop hotdogs into boiling water. The “legs” will curl during cooking to resemble an octopus. Serve your “octopus” over the “sea” of noodles. Optional: Use ketchup and mustard to draw eyes and mouth on the “octopus” using a toothpick.


SMILING ON THE SIDELINES

April 14, 2008

As spring and summer sports kick off, kids aren’t the only ones working up a sweat. Nervous parents, many who have shelled out thousands of dollars in orthodontic care, are sweating on the sidelines in fear that their kids will end up with a mouth injury.

My family is no exception. It seems like we’ve shelled out enough on orthodontia over the years to feed a third-world country for a decade.

I found out that April is National Sports Injury Prevention Month. this was just excuse I needed to ask a dentist who specializes in this sort of thing (he founded Emergency Dental Care USA), for some advice.

So… here’s a roundup of Dr. Michael Obeng’s suggestions for preventing injury to my daughter’s million (or at least several thousand) dollar smile.

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